HOUSE I
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House #
House Style
Size Ft2
Year Built
Cost/Ft2
1
Earth-bermed & Stick built
1575 House + 480 Garage
2005
$133
Architect/Designer
General Contractor
Sub-contractors (significant) & Type
Howard Charrington—Integrated Design Concepts Dave Ekblad Tim Otonicar—Electric

Scot Domergue – Stone work and early design consultation

Scott Alexander—Cascade Foam Insulation & Stucco

Primary E-Design Factors
Significant E-Products Used
Results—Positive/Negative
Earth-Bermed
Whole House Vent/Heat Exchanger
Wired for PV system, but not installed
Sola Tube
No Dryer
Progressive dimmers
Sola Tube™ for indoor lighting in back bathroom, instead of skylight

Whole house ventilation/ heat exchange systems, Fan Tech, Life Breath
This house uses a low amount of energy for heating, cooling, and lighting because of the earth berming.The atmosphere is quiet and peaceful also due to the earth berming, and feels very open to the outside, at the same time. The air quality in this house is exceptionally comfortable.
The owner wanted a house that would have a low visual impact, and yet be strongly connected to the outside. Other requirements were that it could be heated and cooled with a minimum of energy, be low maintenance, and have a quiet interior. All of these requirements were met by earth berming the house.The house is neatly tucked into an existing hillside; there is an open patio in front of the house to connect it to the outside. Heating is via passive solar orientation (southern windows), electric radiant floor, space heater, and a propane stove. Cooling is accomplished by the roof overhang which reduces summer sun penetration, and a whole house ventilation-heat exchanger system manufactured by "Fan Tech" & "Life Breath". The whole house ventilation system keeps moisture from condensing on the windows of the house. The Sola Tube gives a considerable amount daylight to the bathroom, while allowing less heat to escape the house.

This is an elegant house with a sustainable mind set. The owner even put in the infrastructure, when constructing the home, to have the option to install solar energy in the future.